Capgemini Reading Comprehension Quiz – 1

Question 1

Time: 00:00:00
Studies of the Weddell seal in the laboratory have described the physiological mechanisms that allow the seal to cope with the extreme oxygen deprivation that occurs during its longest dives, which can extend 500 meters below the ocean’s surface and last for over 70 minutes. Recent field studies, however, suggest that during more typical dives in the wild, this seal’s physiological behavior is different. In the laboratory, when the seal dives below the surface of the water and stops breathing, its heart beats more slowly, requiring less oxygen, and its arteries become constricted, ensuring that the seal’s blood remains concentrated near those organs most crucial to its ability to navigate underwater. The seal essentially shuts off the flow of blood to other organs, which either stop functioning until the seal surfaces or switch to an anaerobic (oxygen-independent) metabolism. The latter results in the production of large amounts of lactic acid which can adversely affect the pH of the seal’s blood, but since the anaerobic metabolism occurs only in those tissues which have been isolated from the seal’s blood supply, the lactic acid is released into the seal’s blood only after the seal surfaces, when the lungs, liver, and other organs quickly clear the acid from the seal’s bloodstream.

Recent field studies, however, reveal that on dives in the wild, the seal usually heads directly for its prey and returns to the surface in less than twenty minutes. The absence of high levels of lactic acid in the seal’s blood after such dives suggests that during them, the seal’s organs do not resort to the anaerobic metabolism observed in the laboratory, but are supplied with oxygen from the blood. The seal’s longer excursions underwater, during which it appears to be either exploring distant routes or evading a predator, do evoke the diving response seen in the laboratory. But why do the seal’s laboratory dives always evoke this response, regardless of their length or depth? Some biologists speculate that because in laboratory dives the seal is forcibly submerged, it does not know how long it will remain underwater and so prepares for the worst.

The passage provides information to support which of the following generalizations?

Observations of animals’ physiological behavior in the wild are not reliable unless verified by laboratory studies.

Observations of animals’ physiological behavior in the wild are not reliable unless verified by laboratory studies.

It is generally less difficult to observe the physiological behavior of an animal in the wild than in the laboratory.

It is generally less difficult to observe the physiological behavior of an animal in the wild than in the laboratory.

The level of lactic acid in an animal’s blood is likely to be higher when it is searching for prey than when it is evading predators.

The level of lactic acid in an animal’s blood is likely to be higher when it is searching for prey than when it is evading predators.

The level of lactic acid in an animal’s blood is likely to be lowest during those periods in which it experiences oxygen deprivation.

The level of lactic acid in an animal’s blood is likely to be lowest during those periods in which it experiences oxygen deprivation.

The physiological behavior of animals in a laboratory setting is not always consistent with their physiological behavior in the wild.

The physiological behavior of animals in a laboratory setting is not always consistent with their physiological behavior in the wild.

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Question 2

Time: 00:00:00
Studies of the Weddell seal in the laboratory have described the physiological mechanisms that allow the seal to cope with the extreme oxygen deprivation that occurs during its longest dives, which can extend 500 meters below the ocean’s surface and last for over 70 minutes. Recent field studies, however, suggest that during more typical dives in the wild, this seal’s physiological behavior is different. In the laboratory, when the seal dives below the surface of the water and stops breathing, its heart beats more slowly, requiring less oxygen, and its arteries become constricted, ensuring that the seal’s blood remains concentrated near those organs most crucial to its ability to navigate underwater. The seal essentially shuts off the flow of blood to other organs, which either stop functioning until the seal surfaces or switch to an anaerobic (oxygen-independent) metabolism. The latter results in the production of large amounts of lactic acid which can adversely affect the pH of the seal’s blood, but since the anaerobic metabolism occurs only in those tissues which have been isolated from the seal’s blood supply, the lactic acid is released into the seal’s blood only after the seal surfaces, when the lungs, liver, and other organs quickly clear the acid from the seal’s bloodstream.

Recent field studies, however, reveal that on dives in the wild, the seal usually heads directly for its prey and returns to the surface in less than twenty minutes. The absence of high levels of lactic acid in the seal’s blood after such dives suggests that during them, the seal’s organs do not resort to the anaerobic metabolism observed in the laboratory, but are supplied with oxygen from the blood. The seal’s longer excursions underwater, during which it appears to be either exploring distant routes or evading a predator, do evoke the diving response seen in the laboratory. But why do the seal’s laboratory dives always evoke this response, regardless of their length or depth? Some biologists speculate that because in laboratory dives the seal is forcibly submerged, it does not know how long it will remain underwater and so prepares for the worst.

It can be inferred from the passage that by describing the Weddell seal as preparing “for the worst” (line 41), biologists mean that it.

Prepares to remain underwater for no longer than twenty minutes

Prepares to remain underwater for no longer than twenty minutes

Exhibits physiological behavior similar to that which characterizes dives in which it heads directly for its prey

Exhibits physiological behavior similar to that which characterizes dives in which it heads directly for its prey

Exhibits physiological behavior similar to that which characterizes its longest dives in the wild

Exhibits physiological behavior similar to that which characterizes its longest dives in the wild

Begins to exhibit predatory behaviour

Begins to exhibit predatory behaviour

Clears the lactic acid from its blood before attempting to dive

Clears the lactic acid from its blood before attempting to dive

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Question 3

Time: 00:00:00
Studies of the Weddell seal in the laboratory have described the physiological mechanisms that allow the seal to cope with the extreme oxygen deprivation that occurs during its longest dives, which can extend 500 meters below the ocean’s surface and last for over 70 minutes. Recent field studies, however, suggest that during more typical dives in the wild, this seal’s physiological behavior is different. In the laboratory, when the seal dives below the surface of the water and stops breathing, its heart beats more slowly, requiring less oxygen, and its arteries become constricted, ensuring that the seal’s blood remains concentrated near those organs most crucial to its ability to navigate underwater. The seal essentially shuts off the flow of blood to other organs, which either stop functioning until the seal surfaces or switch to an anaerobic (oxygen-independent) metabolism. The latter results in the production of large amounts of lactic acid which can adversely affect the pH of the seal’s blood, but since the anaerobic metabolism occurs only in those tissues which have been isolated from the seal’s blood supply, the lactic acid is released into the seal’s blood only after the seal surfaces, when the lungs, liver, and other organs quickly clear the acid from the seal’s bloodstream.

Recent field studies, however, reveal that on dives in the wild, the seal usually heads directly for its prey and returns to the surface in less than twenty minutes. The absence of high levels of lactic acid in the seal’s blood after such dives suggests that during them, the seal’s organs do not resort to the anaerobic metabolism observed in the laboratory, but are supplied with oxygen from the blood. The seal’s longer excursions underwater, during which it appears to be either exploring distant routes or evading a predator, do evoke the diving response seen in the laboratory. But why do the seal’s laboratory dives always evoke this response, regardless of their length or depth? Some biologists speculate that because in laboratory dives the seal is forcibly submerged, it does not know how long it will remain underwater and so prepares for the worst.
The passage suggests that during laboratory dives, the pH of the Weddell seal’s blood is not adversely affected by the production of lactic acid because

Only those organs that are essential to the seal’s ability to navigate underwater revert to an anaerobic mechanism

Only those organs that are essential to the seal’s ability to navigate underwater revert to an anaerobic mechanism

The seal typically reverts to an anaerobic metabolism only at the very end of the dive

The seal typically reverts to an anaerobic metabolism only at the very end of the dive

Organs that revert to an anaerobic metabolism are temporarily isolated from the seal’s bloodstream

Organs that revert to an anaerobic metabolism are temporarily isolated from the seal’s bloodstream

Oxygen continues to be supplied to organs that clear lactic acid from the seal’s bloodstream

Oxygen continues to be supplied to organs that clear lactic acid from the seal’s bloodstream

The seal remains submerged for only short periods of time

The seal remains submerged for only short periods of time

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Question 4

Time: 00:00:00
Studies of the Weddell seal in the laboratory have described the physiological mechanisms that allow the seal to cope with the extreme oxygen deprivation that occurs during its longest dives, which can extend 500 meters below the ocean’s surface and last for over 70 minutes. Recent field studies, however, suggest that during more typical dives in the wild, this seal’s physiological behavior is different. In the laboratory, when the seal dives below the surface of the water and stops breathing, its heart beats more slowly, requiring less oxygen, and its arteries become constricted, ensuring that the seal’s blood remains concentrated near those organs most crucial to its ability to navigate underwater. The seal essentially shuts off the flow of blood to other organs, which either stop functioning until the seal surfaces or switch to an anaerobic (oxygen-independent) metabolism. The latter results in the production of large amounts of lactic acid which can adversely affect the pH of the seal’s blood, but since the anaerobic metabolism occurs only in those tissues which have been isolated from the seal’s blood supply, the lactic acid is released into the seal’s blood only after the seal surfaces, when the lungs, liver, and other organs quickly clear the acid from the seal’s bloodstream.

Recent field studies, however, reveal that on dives in the wild, the seal usually heads directly for its prey and returns to the surface in less than twenty minutes. The absence of high levels of lactic acid in the seal’s blood after such dives suggests that during them, the seal’s organs do not resort to the anaerobic metabolism observed in the laboratory, but are supplied with oxygen from the blood. The seal’s longer excursions underwater, during which it appears to be either exploring distant routes or evading a predator, do evoke the diving response seen in the laboratory. But why do the seal’s laboratory dives always evoke this response, regardless of their length or depth? Some biologists speculate that because in laboratory dives the seal is forcibly submerged, it does not know how long it will remain underwater and so prepares for the worst.

Which of the following best summarizes the main point of the passage?

Recent field studies have indicated that descriptions of the physiological behavior of the Weddell seal during laboratory dives are not applicable to its most typical dives in the wild.

Recent field studies have indicated that descriptions of the physiological behavior of the Weddell seal during laboratory dives are not applicable to its most typical dives in the wild.

The Weddell seal has developed a number of unique mechanisms that enable it to remain submerged at depths of up to 500 meters for up to 70 minutes.

The Weddell seal has developed a number of unique mechanisms that enable it to remain submerged at depths of up to 500 meters for up to 70 minutes.

The results of recent field studies have made it necessary for biologists to revise previous perceptions of how the Weddell seal behaves physiologically during its longest dives in the wild.

The results of recent field studies have made it necessary for biologists to revise previous perceptions of how the Weddell seal behaves physiologically during its longest dives in the wild.

Biologists speculate that laboratory studies of the physiological behavior of seals during dives lasting more than twenty minutes would be more accurate if the seals were not forcibly submerged.

Biologists speculate that laboratory studies of the physiological behavior of seals during dives lasting more than twenty minutes would be more accurate if the seals were not forcibly submerged.

How the Weddell seal responds to oxygen deprivation during its longest dives appears to depend on whether the seal is searching for prey or avoiding predators during such dives.

How the Weddell seal responds to oxygen deprivation during its longest dives appears to depend on whether the seal is searching for prey or avoiding predators during such dives.

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Question 5

Time: 00:00:00
Read the passage given below and answer the question that follow.
Spring was the season of green mountain and meadows, blushing snow and an expanse of yellow
mustard flowers in the fields around our village. On radio Kashmir, they played songs in kashmir
celebrating the flowers in the meadows and the nightingales on willow branches. My favorite song
ended with the refrain:’And the night angle sings to the flowers: Our land is a garden!’. When we had
to harvest a crop, our neighbors and friends would send someone for help; when it was their turn, we
would reciprocate. You never needed to make a formal request weeks in advance, somebody always
turned up.
During the farming season, Akhoon, the mullah, who refused to believe that Neil Armstrong had
landed on the moon, complained about the thinning attendance at our neighborhood mosque. I
struggled to control my laughter when the villagers, anxious to get back to farming, coughed during
the prayers to make him finish faster. He compromised by reading shorter chapters from the holy
book and them turning up at the fields to collect a seasonal donation--his fees for leading prayers at
the mosque.

In summer, after the mustard was reaped, we planted rice seedlings. On weekdays, before we left for
school, my brother and I took samovers of kahwa, the sweet brew of saffron, almonds, and cinnamon,
to the laborers working in our fields. On weekends, I would help grandfather and other men carry
sacks of seedlings from the nurseries; my mother, aunts, and other neighboring women bent in rows
in the well-watered fields, planted and sang.

If the passage was a part of a book; which of the following would be the literary genre of the
book?

1. Fiction
2. Religion and beliefs
3. Politics
4. Memoir
5. Non-fiction
Choose appropriate alternative(s) based on the theme of the passage.

1,2,3, and 4 only

1,2,3, and 4 only

4 and 5 only

4 and 5 only

3,4, and 5 only

3,4, and 5 only

1,2, and 4 only

1,2, and 4 only

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Question 6

Time: 00:00:00
Read the passage given below and answer the question that follow.

Spring was the season of green mountain and meadows, blushing snow and an expanse of yellow
mustard flowers in the fields around our village. On radio Kashmir, they played songs in kashmir
celebrating the flowers in the meadows and the nightingales on willow branches. My favorite song
ended with the refrain:’And the night angle sings to the flowers: Our land is a garden!’. When we had
to harvest a crop, our neighbors and friends would send someone for help; when it was their turn, we
would reciprocate. You never needed to make a formal request weeks in advance, somebody always
turned up.
During the farming season, Akhoon, the mullah, who refused to believe that Neil Armstrong had
landed on the moon, complained about the thinning attendance at our neighborhood mosque. I
struggled to control my laughter when the villagers, anxious to get back to farming, coughed during
the prayers to make him finish faster. He compromised by reading shorter chapters from the holy
book and them turning up at the fields to collect a seasonal donation--his fees for leading prayers at
the mosque.

In summer, after the mustard was reaped, we planted rice seedlings. On weekdays, before we left for
school, my brother and I took samovers of kahwa, the sweet brew of saffron, almonds, and cinnamon,
to the laborers working in our fields. On weekends, I would help grandfather and other men carry
sacks of seedlings from the nurseries; my mother, aunts, and other neighboring women bent in rows
in the well-watered fields, planted and sang.

The conditions of the laborers working in the village is:

contended

contended

 reciprocate.

 reciprocate.

pity

pity

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Question 7

Time: 00:00:00
Read the passage given below and answer the question that follow.

Spring was the season of green mountain and meadows, blushing snow and an expanse of yellow
mustard flowers in the fields around our village. On radio Kashmir, they played songs in kashmir
celebrating the flowers in the meadows and the nightingales on willow branches. My favorite song
ended with the refrain:’And the night angle sings to the flowers: Our land is a garden!’. When we had
to harvest a crop, our neighbors and friends would send someone for help; when it was their turn, we
would reciprocate. You never needed to make a formal request weeks in advance, somebody always
turned up.
During the farming season, Akhoon, the mullah, who refused to believe that Neil Armstrong had
landed on the moon, complained about the thinning attendance at our neighborhood mosque. I
struggled to control my laughter when the villagers, anxious to get back to farming, coughed during
the prayers to make him finish faster. He compromised by reading shorter chapters from the holy
book and them turning up at the fields to collect a seasonal donation--his fees for leading prayers at
the mosque.

In summer, after the mustard was reaped, we planted rice seedlings. On weekdays, before we left for
school, my brother and I took samovers of kahwa, the sweet brew of saffron, almonds, and cinnamon,
to the laborers working in our fields. On weekends, I would help grandfather and other men carry
sacks of seedlings from the nurseries; my mother, aunts, and other neighboring women bent in rows
in the well-watered fields, planted and sang.

The phrase “who refused to believe that Neil Armstrong had landed on the moon”​, in the
second paragraph is used to provide additional information about the character Akhoon.
However, it can be removed without changing the meaning of the sentence.
Such phrases are often used in descriptive writing and are known as:

Directive

Directive

Styling

Styling

Intensifier

Intensifier

Modifier

Modifier

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Question 8

Time: 00:00:00
Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:
I recently sent a message to my boss to let him know that I would be a bit late. The bus hadn’t arrived
despite a 30-minute wait in the freezing cold. To illustrate, I added an emoji of a snowflake and a
snowman from my iphone and sent them to his Android phone. Thankfully, those emoji didn’t get lost
in translation, but I panicked for a second wondering whether they’d appeared as a love heart or a
poop on his phone.
The reason I panicked is that just a few weeks ago I had spent far too much of my time creating a
story made completely from emoji, which I sent a group of friends via facebook messenger. Not one
of those friends replied to say how awesome my story was( and it really was awesome) and I soon
discovered why: on their Android smartphone it made absolutely no sense whatsoever because the
emoji were all different! I was devastated.

The primary concern of the author in the given passage is:

relationship with colleagues

relationship with colleagues

miscommunication

miscommunication

general awareness

general awareness

technical advancement

technical advancement

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Question 9

Time: 00:00:00
Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:
I recently sent a message to my boss to let him know that I would be a bit late. The bus hadn’t arrived
despite a 30-minute wait in the freezing cold. To illustrate, I added an emoji of a snowflake and a
snowman from my iphone and sent them to his Android phone. Thankfully, those emoji didn’t get lost
in translation, but I panicked for a second wondering whether they’d appeared as a love heart or a
poop on his phone.
The reason I panicked is that just a few weeks ago I had spent far too much of my time creating a
story made completely from emoji, which I sent a group of friends via facebook messenger. Not one
of those friends replied to say how awesome my story was( and it really was awesome) and I soon
discovered why: on their Android smartphone it made absolutely no sense whatsoever because the
emoji were all different! I was devastated.

According to the first paragraph, the author was first and then after sending the message to his boss.

relaxed; devastated

relaxed; devastated

relaxed; tensed

relaxed; tensed

tensed; relaxed

tensed; relaxed

tensed; devastated

tensed; devastated

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Question 10

Time: 00:00:00
Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:
I recently sent a message to my boss to let him know that I would be a bit late. The bus hadn’t arrived
despite a 30-minute wait in the freezing cold. To illustrate, I added an emoji of a snowflake and a
snowman from my iphone and sent them to his Android phone. Thankfully, those emoji didn’t get lost
in translation, but I panicked for a second wondering whether they’d appeared as a love heart or a
poop on his phone.
The reason I panicked is that just a few weeks ago I had spent far too much of my time creating a
story made completely from emoji, which I sent a group of friends via facebook messenger. Not one
of those friends replied to say how awesome my story was( and it really was awesome) and I soon
discovered why: on their Android smartphone it made absolutely no sense whatsoever because the
emoji were all different! I was devastated.

Why were the efforts of the author( in creating an emoji-based story) NOT​ appreciated?

The author has no good friends

The author has no good friends

It was random

It was random

Differences in emoji designs across phone types

Differences in emoji designs across phone types

It was the bed story

It was the bed story

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