Reading Comprehension Quiz 1

Question 1

Time: 00:00:00
Direction for Q1 - Q5: Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:

 

Question 1:

Ismat Chughtai’s celebrated masterpiece “Lihaf” needs to be analyzed under the interwoven themes of marriage, subjugation of women and the oppression and neglect of female sexuality and desire. Here, in her typical style, Chughtai raises important questions on marriage as an economic and social enterprise, the socially constructed subordinate role of women in marriage, her sexual fantasies and frustrations and her subsequent sense of loneliness.

The fact that Nawab “installed her (Begum Jan) in the house along with furniture”, highlights how the institution of marriage commodifies women and reduces them to the object of a mere business transaction. Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage that dehumanizes women to fulfill societal obligations and aspirations of upward mobility. Begum Jan was married off to the Nawab by her family, in spite of their age difference, so as to rid themselves of the financial burden and the social taboo of having an unmarried woman in the house. Moreover, since Begum Jan’s family was poor, in her marriage to a rich and influential Nawab, they saw an opportunity to gain economic favour.The status accorded to marriage as an unbreakable social norm, an unquestionable obligation, is also dealt with in the short story. It was and has been till today one of the most important and absolutely essential tenets of the society. Even the Nawab, irrespective of his immense power and formidable position, had to marry, although the opposite sex held no appeal for him owing to his “mysterious hobby”. In the process, poor Begum became a victim to the repressive customs ingrained in the institution of marriage. While the Nawab continued his homosexual exploits, the Begum was condemned to a life of confinement and subjugation. He never displayed any interest in his wife’s life, her wishes, desires and problems and in fact, completely neglected and dismissed her presence in his life. Begum Jan was just his social stamp of approval, a heterosexual cover to escape ridicule and suspicion of society for his inborn homosexual orientation. Beyond that, the Nawab “totally forgot her presence”

In conclusion, it can be said that the redeeming feature of this story, however, lies in the fact that Chughtai does not leave Begum Jan in this state of complete desolation and immense depression, but allows her the agency to make a bold ‘choice’ of homosexuality in indulging with the maidservant Rabbu “who pulled her back from the brink”. Irrespective of whether the story in the end, endorses homosexual behaviour or not, the very fact that Begum Jan is allowed some sort of sexual autonomy in the midst of social confinement, subjugation, repression and social ridicule, leaves behind an emphatic message.

 

Which one of the following can be inferred from the given passage?

 

Under the garb of a social norm and societal obligation, marriage as an institution, often tends to  oppress the participants involved.

Under the garb of a social norm and societal obligation, marriage as an institution, often tends to  oppress the participants involved.

Marriage is a sacred institution across all communities which need not be questioned.

Marriage is a sacred institution across all communities which need not be questioned.

Begum Jan belonged to a financially poor family.

Begum Jan belonged to a financially poor family.

None of the above

None of the above

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Question 2

Time: 00:00:00
Ismat Chughtai’s celebrated masterpiece “Lihaf” needs to be analyzed under the interwoven themes of marriage, subjugation of women and the oppression and neglect of female sexuality and desire. Here, in her typical style, Chughtai raises important questions on marriage as an economic and social enterprise, the socially constructed subordinate role of women in marriage, her sexual fantasies and frustrations and her subsequent sense of loneliness.

The fact that Nawab “installed her (Begum Jan) in the house along with furniture”, highlights how the institution of marriage commodifies women and reduces them to the object of a mere business transaction. Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage that dehumanizes women to fulfill societal obligations and aspirations of upward mobility. Begum Jan was married off to the Nawab by her family, in spite of their age difference, so as to rid themselves of the financial burden and the social taboo of having an unmarried woman in the house. Moreover, since Begum Jan’s family was poor, in her marriage to a rich and influential Nawab, they saw an opportunity to gain economic favour.The status accorded to marriage as an unbreakable social norm, an unquestionable obligation, is also dealt with in the short story. It was and has been till today one of the most important and absolutely essential tenets of the society. Even the Nawab, irrespective of his immense power and formidable position, had to marry, although the opposite sex held no appeal for him owing to his “mysterious hobby”. In the process, poor Begum became a victim to the repressive customs ingrained in the institution of marriage. While the Nawab continued his homosexual exploits, the Begum was condemned to a life of confinement and subjugation. He never displayed any interest in his wife’s life, her wishes, desires and problems and in fact, completely neglected and dismissed her presence in his life. Begum Jan was just his social stamp of approval, a heterosexual cover to escape ridicule and suspicion of society for his inborn homosexual orientation. Beyond that, the Nawab “totally forgot her presence”

In conclusion, it can be said that the redeeming feature of this story, however, lies in the fact that Chughtai does not leave Begum Jan in this state of complete desolation and immense depression, but allows her the agency to make a bold ‘choice’ of homosexuality in indulging with the maidservant Rabbu “who pulled her back from the brink”. Irrespective of whether the story in the end, endorses homosexual behaviour or not, the very fact that Begum Jan is allowed some sort of sexual autonomy in the midst of social confinement, subjugation, repression and social ridicule, leaves behind an emphatic message.

 

Pick out the incorrect statement from the following:

Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage that dehumanizes women to fulfill societal obligations and dreams of upward mobility.

Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage that dehumanizes women to fulfill societal obligations and dreams of upward mobility.

Begum Jan was just a social stamp of approval of Nawab, a heterosexual cover to escape ridicule.

Begum Jan was just a social stamp of approval of Nawab, a heterosexual cover to escape ridicule.

The status accorded to marriage as an unbreakable social norm and an unquestionable obligation is discussed in the short story by Chughtai .

The status accorded to marriage as an unbreakable social norm and an unquestionable obligation is discussed in the short story by Chughtai .

Begum Jan was very dear to the Nawab.

Begum Jan was very dear to the Nawab.

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Question 3

Time: 00:00:00
Ismat Chughtai’s celebrated masterpiece “Lihaf” needs to be analyzed under the interwoven themes of marriage, subjugation of women and the oppression and neglect of female sexuality and desire. Here, in her typical style, Chughtai raises important questions on marriage as an economic and social enterprise, the socially constructed subordinate role of women in marriage, her sexual fantasies and frustrations and her subsequent sense of loneliness.

The fact that Nawab “installed her (Begum Jan) in the house along with furniture”, highlights how the institution of marriage commodifies women and reduces them to the object of a mere business transaction. Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage that dehumanizes women to fulfill societal obligations and aspirations of upward mobility. Begum Jan was married off to the Nawab by her family, in spite of their age difference, so as to rid themselves of the financial burden and the social taboo of having an unmarried woman in the house. Moreover, since Begum Jan’s family was poor, in her marriage to a rich and influential Nawab, they saw an opportunity to gain economic favour.The status accorded to marriage as an unbreakable social norm, an unquestionable obligation, is also dealt with in the short story. It was and has been till today one of the most important and absolutely essential tenets of the society. Even the Nawab, irrespective of his immense power and formidable position, had to marry, although the opposite sex held no appeal for him owing to his “mysterious hobby”. In the process, poor Begum became a victim to the repressive customs ingrained in the institution of marriage. While the Nawab continued his homosexual exploits, the Begum was condemned to a life of confinement and subjugation. He never displayed any interest in his wife’s life, her wishes, desires and problems and in fact, completely neglected and dismissed her presence in his life. Begum Jan was just his social stamp of approval, a heterosexual cover to escape ridicule and suspicion of society for his inborn homosexual orientation. Beyond that, the Nawab “totally forgot her presence”

In conclusion, it can be said that the redeeming feature of this story, however, lies in the fact that Chughtai does not leave Begum Jan in this state of complete desolation and immense depression, but allows her the agency to make a bold ‘choice’ of homosexuality in indulging with the maidservant Rabbu “who pulled her back from the brink”. Irrespective of whether the story in the end, endorses homosexual behaviour or not, the very fact that Begum Jan is allowed some sort of sexual autonomy in the midst of social confinement, subjugation, repression and social ridicule, leaves behind an emphatic message.

Pick out the correct statement from the following:

Begum Jan was free to choose her partner in marriage

Begum Jan was free to choose her partner in marriage

The Nawab expressed interest in his wife’s life

The Nawab expressed interest in his wife’s life

Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage.

Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage.

Chughtai raises important questions on the evils of dowry system and bride burning.

Chughtai raises important questions on the evils of dowry system and bride burning.

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Question 4

Time: 00:00:00
Ismat Chughtai’s celebrated masterpiece “Lihaf” needs to be analyzed under the interwoven themes of marriage, subjugation of women and the oppression and neglect of female sexuality and desire. Here, in her typical style, Chughtai raises important questions on marriage as an economic and social enterprise, the socially constructed subordinate role of women in marriage, her sexual fantasies and frustrations and her subsequent sense of loneliness.

The fact that Nawab “installed her (Begum Jan) in the house along with furniture”, highlights how the institution of marriage commodifies women and reduces them to the object of a mere business transaction. Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage that dehumanizes women to fulfill societal obligations and aspirations of upward mobility. Begum Jan was married off to the Nawab by her family, in spite of their age difference, so as to rid themselves of the financial burden and the social taboo of having an unmarried woman in the house. Moreover, since Begum Jan’s family was poor, in her marriage to a rich and influential Nawab, they saw an opportunity to gain economic favour.The status accorded to marriage as an unbreakable social norm, an unquestionable obligation, is also dealt with in the short story. It was and has been till today one of the most important and absolutely essential tenets of the society. Even the Nawab, irrespective of his immense power and formidable position, had to marry, although the opposite sex held no appeal for him owing to his “mysterious hobby”. In the process, poor Begum became a victim to the repressive customs ingrained in the institution of marriage. While the Nawab continued his homosexual exploits, the Begum was condemned to a life of confinement and subjugation. He never displayed any interest in his wife’s life, her wishes, desires and problems and in fact, completely neglected and dismissed her presence in his life. Begum Jan was just his social stamp of approval, a heterosexual cover to escape ridicule and suspicion of society for his inborn homosexual orientation. Beyond that, the Nawab “totally forgot her presence”

In conclusion, it can be said that the redeeming feature of this story, however, lies in the fact that Chughtai does not leave Begum Jan in this state of complete desolation and immense depression, but allows her the agency to make a bold ‘choice’ of homosexuality in indulging with the maidservant Rabbu “who pulled her back from the brink”. Irrespective of whether the story in the end, endorses homosexual behaviour or not, the very fact that Begum Jan is allowed some sort of sexual autonomy in the midst of social confinement, subjugation, repression and social ridicule, leaves behind an emphatic message.

 

Which one of the following is the synonym of the word ‘desolation’ as used in the context of the passage?

Loneliness

Loneliness

Creation

Creation

Cheer

Cheer

Pursuit

Pursuit

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Question 5

Time: 00:00:00
Ismat Chughtai’s celebrated masterpiece “Lihaf” needs to be analyzed under the interwoven themes of marriage, subjugation of women and the oppression and neglect of female sexuality and desire. Here, in her typical style, Chughtai raises important questions on marriage as an economic and social enterprise, the socially constructed subordinate role of women in marriage, her sexual fantasies and frustrations and her subsequent sense of loneliness.

The fact that Nawab “installed her (Begum Jan) in the house along with furniture”, highlights how the institution of marriage commodifies women and reduces them to the object of a mere business transaction. Chughtai critiques the mercenary aspect of marriage that dehumanizes women to fulfill societal obligations and aspirations of upward mobility. Begum Jan was married off to the Nawab by her family, in spite of their age difference, so as to rid themselves of the financial burden and the social taboo of having an unmarried woman in the house. Moreover, since Begum Jan’s family was poor, in her marriage to a rich and influential Nawab, they saw an opportunity to gain economic favour.The status accorded to marriage as an unbreakable social norm, an unquestionable obligation, is also dealt with in the short story. It was and has been till today one of the most important and absolutely essential tenets of the society. Even the Nawab, irrespective of his immense power and formidable position, had to marry, although the opposite sex held no appeal for him owing to his “mysterious hobby”. In the process, poor Begum became a victim to the repressive customs ingrained in the institution of marriage. While the Nawab continued his homosexual exploits, the Begum was condemned to a life of confinement and subjugation. He never displayed any interest in his wife’s life, her wishes, desires and problems and in fact, completely neglected and dismissed her presence in his life. Begum Jan was just his social stamp of approval, a heterosexual cover to escape ridicule and suspicion of society for his inborn homosexual orientation. Beyond that, the Nawab “totally forgot her presence”

In conclusion, it can be said that the redeeming feature of this story, however, lies in the fact that Chughtai does not leave Begum Jan in this state of complete desolation and immense depression, but allows her the agency to make a bold ‘choice’ of homosexuality in indulging with the maidservant Rabbu “who pulled her back from the brink”. Irrespective of whether the story in the end, endorses homosexual behaviour or not, the very fact that Begum Jan is allowed some sort of sexual autonomy in the midst of social confinement, subjugation, repression and social ridicule, leaves behind an emphatic message.

 

Which one of the following is the antonym of the word ‘mercenary’ as used in the context of the passage?

Highlighted

Highlighted

Lucid

Lucid

Altruistic

Altruistic

Refined

Refined

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Question 6

Time: 00:00:00
Direction for Q6 - Q10: Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow:

The size of the workforce in Brazil, the number of kids at home and parents to sustain will obviously have a great impact on the extent of poverty in Brazilian households. In fact, the demographic transition that has been ongoing in Brazil for the past few decades has helped a lot in reducing poverty. Less children were born in poorer families and that’s less children that ended up involved in street violence, drugs, gangs and so on. More parents were then able to push their kids to go to school and get an education.

 

Of course, the situation is still pretty bad in Brazilian slums (favelas), but it’s estimated that the demographic transition had an impact equivalent to + 0.5% in GDP growth, which is not bad at all considering that the average GDP growth (per capita) was about 3% per year at the time. And since this transition happened over 30 years, its impact on the economy is equal to around 15% of growth in GDP (over three decades). Overall, the change in the family structure and in Brazilians’ lifestyle has had a much greater impact on reducing poverty than the speed of the demographic transition itself. On the other hand, the transition did have an influence on wages (e.g. supply of labor) and interest rates in a way that worsened poverty in Brazil (less overall income).

 

What does the term ‘favelas’ used in the passage refer to?

street kids

street kids

interest rates prevailing in brazil

interest rates prevailing in brazil

slums in brazil

slums in brazil

labour supply

labour supply

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Question 7

Time: 00:00:00
The size of the workforce in Brazil, the number of kids at home and parents to sustain will obviously have a great impact on the extent of poverty in Brazilian households. In fact, the demographic transition that has been ongoing in Brazil for the past few decades has helped a lot in reducing poverty. Less children were born in poorer families and that’s less children that ended up involved in street violence, drugs, gangs and so on. More parents were then able to push their kids to go to school and get an education.

 

Of course, the situation is still pretty bad in Brazilian slums (favelas), but it’s estimated that the demographic transition had an impact equivalent to + 0.5% in GDP growth, which is not bad at all considering that the average GDP growth (per capita) was about 3% per year at the time. And since this transition happened over 30 years, its impact on the economy is equal to around 15% of growth in GDP (over three decades). Overall, the change in the family structure and in Brazilians’ lifestyle has had a much greater impact on reducing poverty than the speed of the demographic transition itself. On the other hand, the transition did have an influence on wages (e.g. supply of labor) and interest rates in a way that worsened poverty in Brazil (less overall income).

What has impacted on reducing poverty in Brazil than the speed of the demographic transition itself?

Brazilians lifestyle

Brazilians lifestyle

Both Brazilians lifestyle and change in family structure

Both Brazilians lifestyle and change in family structure

awareness among citizens

awareness among citizens

change in family structure

change in family structure

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Question 8

Time: 00:00:00
The size of the workforce in Brazil, the number of kids at home and parents to sustain will obviously have a great impact on the extent of poverty in Brazilian households. In fact, the demographic transition that has been ongoing in Brazil for the past few decades has helped a lot in reducing poverty. Less children were born in poorer families and that’s less children that ended up involved in street violence, drugs, gangs and so on. More parents were then able to push their kids to go to school and get an education.

 

Of course, the situation is still pretty bad in Brazilian slums (favelas), but it’s estimated that the demographic transition had an impact equivalent to + 0.5% in GDP growth, which is not bad at all considering that the average GDP growth (per capita) was about 3% per year at the time. And since this transition happened over 30 years, its impact on the economy is equal to around 15% of growth in GDP (over three decades). Overall, the change in the family structure and in Brazilians’ lifestyle has had a much greater impact on reducing poverty than the speed of the demographic transition itself. On the other hand, the transition did have an influence on wages (e.g. supply of labor) and interest rates in a way that worsened poverty in Brazil (less overall income).

According to the passage, Brazilian children born in poorer families were not involved in which kind of activity so often?

bullying

bullying

street violence

street violence

gangs

gangs

drugs

drugs

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Question 9

Time: 00:00:00
The size of the workforce in Brazil, the number of kids at home and parents to sustain will obviously have a great impact on the extent of poverty in Brazilian households. In fact, the demographic transition that has been ongoing in Brazil for the past few decades has helped a lot in reducing poverty. Less children were born in poorer families and that’s less children that ended up involved in street violence, drugs, gangs and so on. More parents were then able to push their kids to go to school and get an education.

 

Of course, the situation is still pretty bad in Brazilian slums (favelas), but it’s estimated that the demographic transition had an impact equivalent to + 0.5% in GDP growth, which is not bad at all considering that the average GDP growth (per capita) was about 3% per year at the time. And since this transition happened over 30 years, its impact on the economy is equal to around 15% of growth in GDP (over three decades). Overall, the change in the family structure and in Brazilians’ lifestyle has had a much greater impact on reducing poverty than the speed of the demographic transition itself. On the other hand, the transition did have an influence on wages (e.g. supply of labor) and interest rates in a way that worsened poverty in Brazil (less overall income).

What has helped Brazil in reducing its poverty?

Brazilians Lifestyle

Brazilians Lifestyle

demographic transition

demographic transition

initiation of peaceful activities

initiation of peaceful activities

education of kids

education of kids

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Question 10

Time: 00:00:00
The size of the workforce in Brazil, the number of kids at home and parents to sustain will obviously have a great impact on the extent of poverty in Brazilian households. In fact, the demographic transition that has been ongoing in Brazil for the past few decades has helped a lot in reducing poverty. Less children were born in poorer families and that’s less children that ended up involved in street violence, drugs, gangs and so on. More parents were then able to push their kids to go to school and get an education.

 

Of course, the situation is still pretty bad in Brazilian slums (favelas), but it’s estimated that the demographic transition had an impact equivalent to + 0.5% in GDP growth, which is not bad at all considering that the average GDP growth (per capita) was about 3% per year at the time. And since this transition happened over 30 years, its impact on the economy is equal to around 15% of growth in GDP (over three decades). Overall, the change in the family structure and in Brazilians’ lifestyle has had a much greater impact on reducing poverty than the speed of the demographic transition itself. On the other hand, the transition did have an influence on wages (e.g. supply of labor) and interest rates in a way that worsened poverty in Brazil (less overall income).

According to the passage, which of the following doesn’t have an impact on the extent of poverty in Brazilian households?

number of kids at home

number of kids at home

size of the workforce

size of the workforce

parents

parents

nature of job

nature of job

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